Rosen Center

for Alternative Pest Control

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Quick Information

Jessica Kivett, Facility Manager
University of Arkansas
979 W Maple St
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-8737
Email: kivett@uark.edu

The Rosen Center is located at 979 West Maple Street, adjacent to the Plant Science Building on the Fayetteville campus of the University of Arkansas. The Center maintains a  two-story laboratory, office, conference and classroom building of 19,000 square feet with an additional 13,000 square feet of greenhouse space.

Read More for Facilities and Occupant Information

Assignments of plant growth facilities for research and teaching will be made by the Rosen Center Management Committee in response to proposals submitted electronically to the facility manager on one of the following space request forms.

The Management Committee will assign space for approved proposals pending availability of space. Space will be allocated to projects best fitting the mission and objectives of the Rosen Center for Alternative Pest Control.

There will be no permanent assignments of space. Projects requiring facilities for greater than a year must undergo a Management Committee review in November of each year. An extension can be obtained only by submission of a new space request at least one month in advance of the original termination date.

Faculty wishing to utilize teaching greenhouse space must submit a request and describe the use of the space at least one semester prior to the intended start date.

There will be no sub-letting of Rosen Center facilities. Unused or unneeded space reverts back to the Rosen Center for reassignment. Under no circumstances may modifications be made to any part of the facilities without authorization by the Management Committee. The facilities must be restored to their original condition at the end of the assigned use period.

Detailed space assignment policies are available in Sections I and II of the Rosen Center Policy and Management Guidelines.

Mission

The Harry R. Rosen Alternative Pest Control Center facilitates the development of research-based solutions to overcome critical agricultural challenges, maintains excellence in environmental stewardship, promotes best crop management practices, and trains students in agricultural sciences. The solutions developed at the Center address ever-changes agronomic and horticultural problems such as insect, nematode, plant disease and weed problems, as well as abiotic issues. This multi-disciplinary effort will develop and transfer credible, timely and objective alternative pest control information and technology to students, researchers, extension personnel, the agricultural community, and other share-holders within the state of Arkansas, the nation and the world.

Center projects support traditional plant breeding with research on molecular tools to identify and exploit genetic sources of pest resistance. Research at the molecular and physiological levels reveals the basis of natural plant defense mechanisms, forming the foundation for the future development of improved plant germplasm and crop management practices.

The Rosen Center is administered by the University of Arkansas System’s Division of Agriculture and the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station. Research at the center goes hand in hand with projects conducted at the division’s research and extension centers and other field locations throughout the state. Research and extension centers and research stations are focal points for field evaluation of alternative pest control and management strategies and tactics, the development of system-wide integrated pest management programs and the dissemination of credible, timely and objective information and technology.

 

Origins of the Center

Beginning in the 1920s, Harry R. Rosen, Dwight Isley, V.H. Young and other University of Arkansas scientists pioneered the concepts of integrated insect management and plant disease control. Their work on integrated host plant resistance, seed quality, crop rotation, cultivation and chemical or biological applications based on pest scouting were hallmarks of crop production technology in Arkansas. In 1953, Rosen was named Arkansas Man of the Year in Agriculture by Progressive Farmers magazine for his role in developing disease-resistant and winter-hardy varieties of wheat and oats.

George Templeton was also a leader in establishing the study and development of mycoherbicides as a new research discipline in the 1980s. Since then, the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station has been actively engaged in research on alternative control strategies using microorganisms and insects as well as recombinant DNA technology for enhanced host resistance. The Harry R. Rosen Alternative Pest Control Center was dedicated in 1996 and has improved the ability of Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station scientists to do this work by enabling the safe evaluation of microorganisms, insects, and transgenic plant material.

Going Beyond Pesticides

The Rosen Alternative Pest Control Center was dedicated in 1996 to develop and implement effective, economical and environmentally responsible biological alternatives to chemical management of agricultural pest problems

Improving Crop Health

The center projects support traditional plant breeding with research on molecular tools to identify and exploit genetic sources of pest resistance. Research at the molecular and physiological levels reveals the basis of natural plant defense mechanisms, forming the foundation for future development of improved plant germplasm and crop management practices.