Peaches and

Nectarines

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Peaches and Nectarine breeding focuses on unique texture, white flesh and improved postharvest qualities suitable for shipping ripe fruit.

Effie

Released in 2018. White-fleshed clingstone nectarine with medium acidity, full blush, excellent white nectarine flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. The latest ripening (around 16 July) nectarine from the University of Arkansas. 

Effie HortSci Article 
Effie Youtube Video

Souvenirs

Released in 2012. Freestone slow-softening peach with light, low acid flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season and has excellent postharvest storage potential. The first yellow-fleshed, fresh-market peach released by the University of Arkansas. 

Souvenirs HortSci Article 
Souvenirs Youtube Video

White County

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed freestone slow-softening peach which ripens mid-season and has little to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White County HortSci Article 
White County Youtube Video

Arrington

Released in 2000. Yellow flesh clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens around June 21.   

Arrington HortSci Article

Amoore Sweet

Released in 2012. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with low acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. A sibling of Bowden. 

Amoore Sweet HortSci Article 
Amoore Sweet Youtube video

White Cloud

Released in 2009. White-fleshed clingstone peach with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. 

White Cloud HortSci Article

White River

Released in 2002. The first white-fleshed peach released from the University of Arkansas. It is a freestone peach that ripens mid- to late-season with standard-high acidity, attractive skin color, and very low to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White River HortSci Article

Bradley

Released in 2000. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and a distinct ‘nectarine’ flavor. Ripens mid-season and produces large fruit with good postharvest storage potential. 

Bradley HortSci Article 
Bradley Youtube Video

Bowden

Released in 2012. The first white-fleshed clingstone nectarine released by the University of Arkansas. Ripens mid-season, has standard acidity, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. A sibling of Amoore Sweet. 

Bowden HortSci Article 
Bowden Youtube video

White Rock

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed clingstone peach with little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens early, around June 25. 

White Rock HortSci Article 
White Rock Youtube Video

Westbrook

Released in 2000. Yellow melting flesh nectarine with some red pigment and high blush with standard acidity. Ripens early, around 12 June, and shows little to no incidence of bacterial spot.   

Westbrook HortSci Article

Effie

Released in 2018. White-fleshed clingstone nectarine with medium acidity, full blush, excellent white nectarine flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. The latest ripening (around 16 July) nectarine from the University of Arkansas. 

Effie HortSci Article 
Effie Youtube Video

Bowden

Released in 2012. The first white-fleshed clingstone nectarine released by the University of Arkansas. Ripens mid-season, has standard acidity, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. A sibling of Amoore Sweet. 

Bowden HortSci Article 
Bowden Youtube video

White Cloud

Released in 2009. White-fleshed clingstone peach with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. 

White Cloud HortSci Article

White County

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed freestone slow-softening peach which ripens mid-season and has little to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White County HortSci Article 
White County Youtube Video

Westbrook

Released in 2000. Yellow melting flesh nectarine with some red pigment and high blush with standard acidity. Ripens early, around 12 June, and shows little to no incidence of bacterial spot.   

Westbrook HortSci Article

Bradley

Released in 2000. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and a distinct ‘nectarine’ flavor. Ripens mid-season and produces large fruit with good postharvest storage potential. 

Bradley HortSci Article 
Bradley Youtube Video

Amoore Sweet

Released in 2012. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with low acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. A sibling of Bowden. 

Amoore Sweet HortSci Article 
Amoore Sweet Youtube video

Souvenirs

Released in 2012. Freestone slow-softening peach with light, low acid flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season and has excellent postharvest storage potential. The first yellow-fleshed, fresh-market peach released by the University of Arkansas.

Souvenirs HortSci Article Souvenirs Youtube Video

White Rock

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed clingstone peach with little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens early, around June 25. 

White Rock HortSci Article 
White Rock Youtube Video

White River

Released in 2002. The first white-fleshed peach released from the University of Arkansas. It is a freestone peach that ripens mid- to late-season with standard-high acidity, attractive skin color, and very low to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White River HortSci Article

Arrington

Released in 2000. Yellow flesh clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens around June 21.   

Arrington HortSci Article

Effie

Released in 2018. White-fleshed clingstone nectarine with medium acidity, full blush, excellent white nectarine flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. The latest ripening (around 16 July) nectarine from the University of Arkansas. 

Effie HortSci Article 
Effie Youtube Video

Amoore Sweet

Released in 2012. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with low acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. A sibling of Bowden. 

Amoore Sweet HortSci Article 
Amoore Sweet Youtube video

Bowden

Released in 2012. The first white-fleshed clingstone nectarine released by the University of Arkansas. Ripens mid-season, has standard acidity, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. A sibling of Amoore Sweet. 

Bowden HortSci Article 
Bowden Youtube video

Souvenirs

Released in 2012. Freestone slow-softening peach with light, low acid flavor, and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season and has excellent postharvest storage potential. The first yellow-fleshed, fresh-market peach released by the University of Arkansas. 

Souvenirs HortSci Article 
Souvenirs Youtube Video

White Cloud

Released in 2009. White-fleshed clingstone peach with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens mid-season. 

White Cloud HortSci Article

White Rock

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed clingstone peach with little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens early, around June 25. 

White Rock HortSci Article 
White Rock Youtube Video

White County

Released in 2004. Low-acid, white-fleshed freestone slow-softening peach which ripens mid-season and has little to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White County HortSci Article 
White County Youtube Video

White River

Released in 2002. The first white-fleshed peach released from the University of Arkansas. It is a freestone peach that ripens mid- to late-season with standard-high acidity, attractive skin color, and very low to no incidence of bacterial spot. 

White River HortSci Article

Westbrook

Released in 2000. Yellow melting flesh nectarine with some red pigment and high blush with standard acidity. Ripens early, around 12 June, and shows little to no incidence of bacterial spot.   

Westbrook HortSci Article

Arrington

Released in 2000. Yellow flesh clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and little to no incidence of bacterial spot. Ripens around June 21.   

Arrington HortSci Article

Bradley

Released in 2000. Yellow-fleshed clingstone nectarine with standard acidity and a distinct ‘nectarine’ flavor. Ripens mid-season and produces large fruit with good postharvest storage potential. 

Bradley HortSci Article 
Bradley Youtube Video