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Arkansas Rice Varieties

The Rice Breeding Program has a long history of rice releases benefiting Arkansas Farmers. Yield and agronomic performance data for state and regional rice trials can be found on the Variety Testing Programs page.

Our Rice Breeding Program has had the following impact in Arkansas and the mid-south:

Public Releases Since 1936

new varieties since 2009

2018 Arkansas rice acreage Planted with Arkansas Public varieties

2018 Arkansas Public Varieties Crop Value

Breeding Program Contributions to Rice Growers' Revenues (1983~2016)

Current Varieties

ARoma 17

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ARoma 17 is a high yielding jasmine-type aromatic, mid-season, long-grain rice cultivar developed at the University Of Arkansas System Division Of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center, near Stuttgart, AR. The aromatic line was approved for release for the 2018 growing season. ARoma 17 offers jasmine-type rice more adapted to Arkansas growing conditions for rice producers who want to serve that consumer market.

ARoma 17 is a mid-season variety similar in maturity to Jazzman-2, with excellent straw strength comparable to the varieties ‘Roy J’ and ‘Wells’. The plant height of ARoma 17 is 39.8 inches which is similar to Jazzman-2. Under good conditions, ARoma 17 should provide higher yields than Jazzman-2.

ARoma 17 is moderately susceptible to common races of rice blast and to sheath blight. Under high nitrogen fertilization, ARoma 17 is susceptible to false smut and is rated moderately resistant to bacterial panicle blight. Plants of ARoma 17 have erect culms, green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades. The lemma and palea are straw colored with red apiculi, many of which fade to straw at maturity.

The endosperm of ARoma 17 is nonglutinous, aromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp. Rice quality parameters indicate that ARoma 17 has jasmine-type characteristics with an average apparent starch amylose content of 16.65 g kg-1 and a low gelatinization temperature of 63.66°C, as indicated by an average alkali (17 g kg-1 KOH) spreading reaction of 6 to 7, according to data provided by Riceland Grain Quality Laboratory. Milled kernels of ARoma 17 are similar in size to Wells 7.31 mm and 7.28 mm, respectively.

ARoma 17 was advanced with the use of rice grower check-off funds distributed by the Arkansas Rice Research and Promotion Board.

Diamond

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Diamond rice is a very high yielding, very short-season, long-grain rice developed at the Division of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas. Diamond is close in maturity to LaKast and about 4 to 5 days earlier than the Roy J varietal.  Diamond has straw strength of 3 (equal to Wells) compared to a 4 for LaKast and 1 for Roy J. Diamond is 104 cm in plant height which is similar to Roy J and Wells. Rough rice grain yields of Diamond have consistently ranked as one of the highest in the Arkansas Rice Performance Trials 

Diamond is rated S to sheath blight, blast, stem rot and kernel smut, which compares to Francis, Roy J, and Wells. Diamond is rated MS to bacterial panicle blight and lodging and VS to false smut using the standard disease R = resistant, MR = moderately resistant, MS = moderately susceptible, S = susceptible and VS = very susceptible to disease. Plants of Diamond have erect culms, green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades. The lemma and palea are straw colored with purple apiculi, many of which fade to straw at maturity. 

The endosperm of Diamond is non-glutinous, non-aromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp. Milled kernels of Diamond are long at 7.15 mm compared to Lakast, Roy J, Wells, Taggart, and Mermentau at 7.47, 7.24, 7.16, 7.40 and 7.06 mm, respectively. Rice quality parameters indicate that Diamond has typical southern U.S. long-grain rice cooking quality. Diamond has an average apparent starch amylose content of 22.8 g kg-1 and an intermediate gelatinization temperature (70 – 75 degrees C), as indicated by an average alkali spreading reaction of 3 to 5. 

Titan

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Titan is a high yielding, very early maturing, and short stature medium-grain rice developed at the University of Arkansas Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas.  Titan has outstanding yield potential, good milling and grain quality, and improved lodging and blast resistance compared with the current commercial medium-grain cultivar Jupiter.

Titan is a semidwarf plant type and is moderately susceptible to lodging.  It averaged 97 cm in height in yield tests across Mid-South and is slightly taller than the 95 cm of Jupiter.  However, Titan matures much earlier than Jupiter. The average number of days from emergence to 50% heading is 79 as compared with 86 of Jupiter. Titan appeared susceptible to sheath blight and moderately susceptible to bacterial panicle blight, false smut, kernel smut, rice blast and lodging.

The flag leaf of Titan is longer than that of Jupiter and well above the panicle canopy at maturity.  The leaves, lemma, and palea are glabrous.  The spikelet is straw colored.  The apiculus is red or purple at heading and the color fades as grains approach maturity.  The grain is non-aromatic.

Titan has the typical medium-grain shape, and its kernels appear much larger and longer (average seed size of 27.6 gms/1000 seeds) than that of Jupiter. The length and width (mm), length/width ratio, and kernel weight (mg) of milled whole kernels of Titan were 5.91, 2.68, 2.21, and 23.20 for Titan as compared with 5.57, 2.66, 2.09, and 21.03 for Jupiter, respectively. Average apparent amylose content of Titan is 150 g kg-1 compared with 156 g kg-1 of Jupiter. Titan also has a low gelatinization temperature of 62.8 degrees C similar to the 62.7 degrees C of Jupiter. Furthermore, Titan and Jupiter share the similar starch Rapid Visco Analyser profiles. These results indicate that Titan has typical U.S. medium-grain rice cooking characteristics.

LaKast

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LaKast rice is a very high yielding, very-short season, long-grain rice cultivar developed at the Division of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas. Rough rice grain yields of LaKast have consistently ranked in the top tier of entrants in the Arkansas Rice Performance Trials.

Milling yields for LaKast in the URRN in Arkansas during 2008-2013 averaged 570:700.  LaKast is similar in maturity to CL111 which is 5 to 7 days earlier than Roy J. LaKast has straw strength of 4 which is similar to  Francis or Wells. LaKast averages 112 cm in plant height.

LaKast is susceptible to common rice blast (races IB-1, IB-33, IB-49, IC-17, IE-1, and IE-1K) with summary ratings in greenhouse tests of 4, 6, 6, 4, 5 and 4, respectively, using the standard disease scale of 0 = immune, 9 = maximum disease susceptibility. LaKast is rated S to kernel smut, sheath spot, stem rot, and false smut.  It is moderately susceptible to lodging, crown (black) sheath rot, sheath blight, narrow brown leaf spot, bacterial panicle blight, and straighthead.

Plants of LaKast have erect culms, green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades. The lemma and palea are straw-colored with red and purple apiculi, many of which fade to straw at maturity.  Kernels of LaKast are long at 7.60 mm compared to Roy J and Wells at 7.22 and 7.25 mm, respectively. Individual milled kernel weights of LaKast, Roy J, Taggart, Templeton, Francis, Wells, and Cheniere averaged 21.9, 20.7, 22.8, 19.0, 18.9, 20.9, and 19.0 mg/kernel, respectively, in the ARPT 2009-2012. 

The endosperm of LaKast is non-glutinous, non-aromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp.  Rice quality parameters indicate that LaKast has typical southern U.S. long-grain rice cooking quality characteristics. LaKast has an average apparent starch amylose content of 22.0 g kg-1 and an intermediate gelatinization temperature (70 – 75 degrees C), as indicated by an average alkali spreading reaction of 3 to 5.

Roy J

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Roy J rice is a very high yielding, mid-season, long-grain rice cultivar developed at the University of Arkansas Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas. Rough rice grain yields of Roy J have consistently ranked among the highest of all entrants in the Arkansas Rice Performance Trials.

Milling yields for Roy J in the URRN in Arkansas during 2008-2013 averaged 580:720. Roy J is similar in maturity to the cultivar Drew.  Roy J has straw strength of 2 which is better than Francis or Wells. Roy J averages 109 cm in plant height.

Roy J is susceptible to common rice blast (races IB-1, IB-33, IB-49, IC-17, IE-1, and IE-1K) with summary ratings in greenhouse tests of 6, 7, 6, 1, 5 and 5, respectively. Roy J is rated MS to sheath blight, black sheat rot and sheath spot, R to narrow brown leaf spot and S to straighthead, false smut, stem rot and bacterial panicle blight and VS to kernel smut.

Plants of Roy J have erect culms, dark green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades.  The lemma and palea are straw-colored with red and purple apiculi, many of which fade to straw at maturity. 

Roy J is partially awned with long awns on the lemma when grown under high fertility. Individual milled kernel weights of Roy J, Francis, Wells, LaGrue, Cybonnet, Cocodrie, and Drew averaged 18.3, 17.3, 18.9, 17.8, 17.7, 17.8, and 15.9, respectively, in the ARPT, 2007-2009. 

The endosperm of Roy J is non-glutinous, non-aromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp. Rice quality parameters indicate that Roy J has typical southern U.S. long-grain rice cooking quality characteristics as described by Webb et al. 1985. Roy J has an average apparent starch amylose content of 22.4 g kg-1 and an intermediate gelatinization temperature (70 – 75 degrees C), as indicated by an average alkali spreading reaction of 3 to 5.

Wells

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Wells is a high-yielding, short-season, long-grain cultivar developed at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas. Rough rice grain yields of Wells have been consistently in the top tier of the ARPT, being comparable to LaGrue and greater than Kaybonnet, Cypress, Newbonnet and Drew.

Milling yields during a 3 year period averaged 610:700.  Wells is similar in maturity to ’LaGrue.  Wells rated a 3 for straw strength scale (0 = very strong straw, 9 = very weak straw). Wells is approximately 100 cm tall.

Wells is resistant to rice blast races IB-45, IB-54, IG-1, and IH-1, rating a 1, 1, 1, and 1, respectively, on a disease scale of 0 = immune, 9 = maximum disease.  It is susceptible to races IB-1, IB-33, IB-49, IC-17, IE-1, and IE-1k, rating a 4-5, 7, 7-8, 7-8, 5-6, and 6, respectively. Wells is very susceptible to stem rot and susceptible to sheath blight, straighthead, bacterial panicle blight, narrow brown leaf spot kernel smut, and false smut. Wells is moderately susceptible to black sheath rot and lodging.          

Wells plants have erect culms, dark green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades.  The lemma and palea are straw colored with colorless to purple colored apiculi, and some short tip awns are present on the lemma at maturity.  The purple apiculi color often fades to straw color at maturity. Kernels are similar in size to those of LaGrue.  In the ARPT (1996-1998) individual milled kernel weights of Wells, LaGrue, Kaybonnet, Drew, and Newbonnet averaged 18.9, 19.0, 15.7, 17.0, and 18.1 mg, respectively.  

The endosperm of Wells is nonglutinous, nonaromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp.  Rice quality parameters indicate that Wells has typical southern U.S. long-grain rice cooking quality characteristics. Wells has an average apparent starch amylose content of 212 g kg-1 and an intermediate gelatinization temperature (70-75 degrees C), as indicated by an average alkali spreading reaction of 3.8.

1099 Short-Grain Rice

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The short-grain rice cultivar 1099 was developed at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture’s Rice Research and Extension Center in Stuttgart, Arkansas. The line originated from a cross made with the famed Japanese short grain rice cultivar Koshihikari, which is a high quality Japanese cultivar in the world collection with low yield potential and poor straw strength. 1099 is similar in maturity to its parent Koshihikari, and has greater straw strength with 1099 rated a 3 versus Koshihikari at an 8. 1099 averages 105 cm in plant height. Over a 6-year span, 1099 average rough rice yields were about 1400 lbs/acre more than Koshihikari. Milling yields over a 6-year period averaged 643:722, 625:721 for 1099 and Koshihikari, respectively.

1099 is susceptible to rice blast and sheath blight. Plants of 1099 have erect culms, green erect leaves, and glabrous lemma, palea, and leaf blades. The lemma and palea are straw colored with straw colored apiculi, and some short tip awns may be found on the lemma under high fertility.  Kernels are similar in size to those of Koshihikari. Individual milled kernel weights of 1099 and Koshihikari, averaged 17.7 and 18.3 mg, respectively, over a 6-year period in the ARPT.

Koshihikari is a premium-quality short-grain Japanese rice cultivar which is desirable as a speciality rice. When compared to Southern medium-grain rice, this rice has a silky smooth texture, glossy appearance, mild aroma, sweet taste, poor agronomic characteristics and low yield potential. 1099 compares favorably with good quality Japanese cultivars.  In an independent test in Japan, 1099 rated a 76 on a Japanese taste testing machine compared to Atitakomachi in the same test which rated a 74 (Koshihikari was not included in their test); the higher the number the better the taste.  They rated the sample lower in other areas and were surprised by the good ratings from the machine.

The endosperm of 1099 is non-glutinous, non-aromatic, and covered by a light brown pericarp. Rice quality parameters indicate that 1099 has short-grain cooking quality characteristics. 1099 has an average apparent starch amylose content of 134 g kg-1 and a low gelatinization temperature (< 70 degrees C), as indicated by an average alkali spreading reaction of 7.0. 1099, like Koshihikari, has the CT 17 allele associated with apparent amylose content.